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Full text of "Excellence attracts excellence: attracting design talent to the Federal service : [a report to Robert E. Hampton, Chairman, U.S. Civil Service Commission"

attracting 


excellence 


december 


design talent 


attracts 


1973 


to the 


excellence 




federal service 








Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/excellenceattracOOunit 



A report to 

Robert E. Hampton 

Chairman, 

U.S. Civil Sen/ice Commission 



from the Task Force on Examining 
Procedures for Design-Related Positions 
in the Federal Government 



table of contents 



Foreword/2 

Task Force members/3 

Recruitment/4 

Classifications and qualifications/6 

Professional development/9 

Administrative awareness/1 1 

Following through/12 



Attachments/13-19 



foreword 



During 1973, about 400 people were 
hired for design-related positions in the 
Federal Government. They joined more 
than 13,000 other Government designers 
as graphic artists, architects, illustrators, 
exhibit specialists and photographers, 
among other design disciplines. 

The influence of these Government 
designers far exceeds their relatively 
small numbers. The appearance of 
publications— and millions are published 
every year— conveys a distinct impression 
of Government programs and activities. 
So do posters, circulars, signs and 
drawings, photographs and exhibits; 
they reach millions of Americans in all 
parts of the country with the message 
of what their Government is doing and 
how well the work is being done. 

Federal buildings make impressions, 
too. Government architecture provides 
an image of Government, an idea of its 
accessibility and, by extension, an 
impression of our national life. 

For these reasons, the Task Force 
studying the recruitment of Federal 
designers approached its assignment with 
seriousness. The President's mandate to 
improve Federal architecture, graphics 
and design; the sheer impact of large- 
scale Federal building and publishing; 
and the need for communication between 
Government and its citizens were 
additional powerful incentives. 



The challenge, as Task Force members 
first saw it, was to enrich the design 
resources of Government by attracting 
the best professionals to the Federal 
service. But it soon became apparent 
that the situation was much more 
complex than an improvement in 
recruiting procedures. 

Only excellence attracts excellence. If 
we were to improve the quality of 
candidates hired for Federal design 
work, we had to stimulate present 
Federal designers to superior efforts 
and create an ideal environment for 
new hires. 

As a result, many of the recommendations 
in the following report involve the 
current Federal design community as 
well as those talented employees 
whom we hope to attract in the 
future. 

Successful recruiting hinges on the basic 
premise that Government is doing 
exciting things in design and is a dynamic 
place in which to work and have 
impact. Efforts must be made to make 
this premise a reality. 

For this reason, much attention has been 
paid to the role of Federal administrators, 
especially those at the highest levels. In 
the final reckoning, it is only with 
administrators' support that these 
recommendations and other elements of 
the Federal Design Improvement Program 
receive force and vitality; this was perhaps 
the most important message of the First 
Federal Design Assembly, held in April, 
1973. 



The Task Force believes that great 
opportunities await the Federal 
Government in the field of design. It 
also believes that these opportunities will 
go begging unless improvements are 
forthcoming in the recruitment, 
evaluation and career development of 
designers. Swift action on the following 
recommendations will substantially 
contribute to that end. 



signatories 



Donald Holum, Task Force Chairman 
U.S. Civil Service Commission 




Jolfn E. Broger, Director 

Office of Information for the Armed 

Forces 

Department of Defense 



Stuart H. Clarke, Deputy Assistant 

Secretary for Administration and 

Management 

Department of Health, Education and 

Welfare 



Boykin A. Glover, Chief 
Armed Forces Press Service 
Department of Defense 
(Alternate) 




Edward Hicks, Chief 

Staffing and Training Branch 

Office of Personnel and Training 

Department of Health, Education and 

Welfare 

(Alternate) 



Lani LaXX^m, Executive Secretary 
Federal Council on the Arts 
and the Humanities 



C. Kent Slepicka 

Special Assistant to the Assistant 

Commissioner for Construction 

Management 

General Services Administration 



fiiixuv^ 



Marion Swannie, Manager 
Design and Arts Program 
IBM 




-7c-UJ^^d^i ^^^^^^-^^ 



Robert McKendry, Superintendent 
Division of Typography and Design 
Government Printing Office 



J 



Lee Treese 

U.S. Civil Service Commission 



C^^^.^^^ i^{/y^ 



Charles W. Moore, FAIA 
Charles W. Moore Associates 



David Granahan, Assistant Director 
Office of Communication 
Department of Agriculture 




Jeronne Perlmutter, Coordinator of 
Federal Graphics 



J. JValter Roth, AIA, Acting Director 
Office of Design Quality 
National Park Service 



recruitment 



Because it is responsible for so many 
important programs and offers unusual 
opportunities for impact and involvement, 
the Federal Government should attract 
outstanding creative people engaged in all 
design professions. Design students and 
experienced professionals should find 
Government programs an attractive 
natural environment in which their skills 
could flourish. 

Unfortunately, under present Government 
recruiting practices, talented designers are 
not being stimulated to seek positions. 
The design community at large is not 
convinced that the Government is 
seriously committed to design excellence 
or that the Government is an exciting 
place in which to work or exert influence. 

Although the numbers of professional 
designers hired in a particular year may 
not seem to demand an all-out recruiting 
drive, specialized recruiting techniques 
should' be used discriminately so that the 
people hired for design-related work are 
the most highly qualified candidates 
available. 



recommendations 

1. 

A highly attractive recruiting publication 
on design opportunities in the Federal 
Government should be prepared. It 
should include stimulating narrative and 
demonstrate the new direction Government 
has taken toward design excellence. To 
the extent practicable, it should reflect 
new procedures recommended by the 
Task Force. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Four months from acceptance of 

this report 



The recruiting publication should be 
distributed to key audiences in the 
designers' marketplace: to the country's 
foremost design schools to interest prime 
candidates for entry level positions; to 
design studios to attract experienced 
practitioners for middle and senior grades; 
to professional societies, organizations 
and trade journals. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Five months from acceptance of 

this report 

3. 

As part of the Commission's college 
relations program, contact should be 
established and maintained with deans of 
design schools and the country's 
outstanding professionals as a resource 
for identifying design talent. Although 
other phases of the recruiting program 
may have already contacted these groups 



through publicity and campus visits, it is 
important for these initiatives to continue 
through mailings and personal contacts to 
assure full involvement and participation. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Two months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 

4. 

When highly qualified candidates are not 
available on the registers, an ongoing 
series of recruiting field trips should be 
made by teams of Federal designers and 
personnel specialists to design schools, 
meetings of professional societies and 
other promising sources of design talent. 
Agency team members should be identified 
who are committed to design improvement 
and who could "sell" the employment 
package professionally and persuasively. 
If there is a need to fill specific positions, 
a team could establish temporary quarters 
in a given location, advertise in the local 
paper and then interview potential 
candidates. The Commission should 
provide leadership and coordination for 
this recruiting effort. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Four months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



Recruitment of Government designers 
should be promoted through a carefully 
coordinated publicity program based on 
the need for quality as well as the 
quantity indicated by hiring forecasts. 
Contacts are needed with professional 
journals, the trade press, outstanding 
design practitioners, design schools and 
related sources. Each contact and 
subsequent follow-up, in the form of 
articles, announcements or paid 
advertisements as needed, must be geared 
to reaching specific target groups — 



architects, graphic designers, industrial 
designers, photographers, etc. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Three months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



To meet agency needs, the current 
successful summer intern program should 
include students from foremost schools 
of design and architecture. In addition, a 
work-study program could be set up, 
under which design students would spend 
a semester with Federal agencies and 
receive credits for the experience. This 
program could lead to recruitment of 
interns after graduation. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 



Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report 



Issues 

1. Need for recruiting brochure 
on design opportunities in the 
Federal Government 



Recommendations 

1. Produce attractively-designed, 
well-written brochure. 



Action 

CSC 



Target Date* 

4 months 



2. Need to distribute brochure 
(See 1 ) 



2. Send brochure to strategic 
audiences 



CSC 



5 months 



3. Need to work with design 
schools in attracting design 
candidates 



3. Maintain ongoing contacts 
with deans and professors of 
leading design schools. 



CSC 



2 months 



4. Need to conduct talent 
searches for artists, designers, 
architects, etc. 



4. Initiate regular field trips 
to recruit top-level design talent. 



CSC 



4 months 



5. Need for promotion, 
education and publicity 



6. Need to attract design 
students to government 



5. Conduct coordinated program 
in media and through direct mail, 
personal contacts. 

6. Expand summer interns program 
to include design students. 



Suggested target dates following acceptance of Task Force report 



CSC 



CSC 



3 months 



6 months 



classification and qualifications 



Government often amplifies confusion 
about jobs by giving them titles different 
from the titles accepted among design 
professions at large and by setting 
qualifications at odds with those normally 
expected. For example, the title "designer," 
which has a clear meaning for professionals, 
does not exist among Government 
classifications. By the same token, "visual 
information specialist" is a job title in 
Government which has no commonly 
accepted counterpart outside the Federal 
service. Moreover, the visual information 
specialist group includes designers (whose 
jobs are filled from the Illustrator register) 
and nondesigners who make decisions 
about visual information. These latter 
visual information specialist jobs are 
filled from the Federal Service Entrance 
Examination. Other titles, like "exhibit 
specialist," "museum specialist," and 
"art specialist" are not clear to the 
private sector and to design schools 
which are potential sources of talent. 

Disparities in qualifications are similarly 
confusing. "Architect," for example, 
has a precise legal meaning involving 
state registration in the private sector. 
This meaning is ignored in the Federal 
Government, which does not require 
registration to bestow the title "architect." 



recommendations 



1. 



The civil service classification system 
should be modified to relate more clearly 
to possible sources of professional talent. 
For purposes of recruitment and general 
classification, the following commonly 
recognized design disciplines are suggested: 



Visual 

Communication 

Group 



Environmental 

Design 

Group 



a. Graphic a. Architecture 
Design b. Landscape 

b. Fine Arts Architecture 

c. Photography c. Urban Planning 

d. Cinematography d. Interior Design 

e. Industrial Design 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report 



Government art directors have little 
confidence in the Civil Service 
Commission's illustrator register. Most art 
directors fill vacancies by word-of-mouth, 
trusting the recommendations of their 
associates to provide qualified people. 
Often a selection is made before the 
Commission is even asked for a list of 
applicants and then the applicants are 
systematically rejected until the selected 
illustrator is "reached." Or they choose 
the person, rewrite the job description 
to fit that person's unique qualifications 
and once again reject applicants 
certified from the register until the 
preselected candidate can be hired. To 
circumvent the register entirely, a 
rewritten job description can be cited as 
justification to hire off the street. 

In any event, the register often presents 
a bureaucratic barrier rather than a 
substantive assistance in filling 
artist-illustrator vacancies and enjoys 
little credibility among art directors. 



Very early during the implementation 
of the Task Force recommendations, 
the responsible agency design officials 
should be informed, either through 
meetings or appropriate Commission 
issuances, that changes are being made 
to improve the selection system. They 
should be encouraged to submit 
suggestions for improvement of the 
register, with the long range aim of 
eliciting their support and use of the 
registers resulting from improved 
recruiting and evaluation techniques. 



Action: 

Civil Service Commission 



Suggested Target Date: 

Four months from acceptance of 

this report 



Because of the wide variety of skills 
and duties encompassed within 
broadly-defined design occupations, 
additional measurement tools are needed 
to rate applicants accurately. Under the 
criteria of present registers, a prospective 
employer who has a vacancy in 
publications design may be required 
to waste a great deal of time interviewing 
applicants with backgrounds completely 
unrelated to his needs. 



Applicants for Federal design jobs should 
complete self-coded forms to supplement 
the Standard Form 171 as a means of 
indicating qualifications which are 
unique to the design field. Such 
supplemental forms should provide for 
the applicant to indicate experience 
with particular processes (i.e., air brush 
techniques) and products (i.e., exhibits) 
in addition to their general education 
and experience. 

The Skills Sheet included as 
page 16 of this report is a 
suggested prototype supplemental 
application form. Similar forms should 
be developed for all general design 
categories. 

The supplemental self-coded form, 
along with the applicant's portfolio and 
Standard Form 171, would serve as the 
basis for rating applicants and entering 
their names on registers. It would also 
serve as the input data sheet for 
computer storage and retrieval as 
vacancies arise. 



The same form or a variation (see 
page 17) could be used as a 
prospective employer's medium to 
indicate the exact skills needed to fill 
a particular vacancy. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Four months from acceptance of 

this report 

With the exception of landscape 
architects, applicants for civil service 
registers in the field of design are not 
reviewed or graded by qualified members 
of the design professions. Eligibility is 
generally determined by personnel 
specialists on the basis of a Personal 
Qualifications Statement which in itself 
is not sufficient to measure design 
capabilities. Although the logistical 
problems involved in reviewing portfolios 
are recognized, the fact remains that no 
artist's capabilities can be judged without 
a professional review of his or her work. 



All applicants meeting education and 
experience requirements for 
design-related positions should be 
required to submit samples of their work 
for review by a "blue ribbon" panel of 
Federal and non-Federal design 
professionals. The size and type of 
portfolio required should depend upon 
the particular discipline involved. 

Procedures for evaluating applicants, 
establishing registers and referral from 
the registers are outlined in the following 
charts. ( pages 1 4 and 1 5 ) 



Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report 

In order to achieve promotion to higher 
grade levels (above GS-12 in many 
occupations), it is the customary practice 
among agencies that design professionals 
must assume supervisory duties in 
addition to or in lieu of participation 
in their creative work. This establishes 
a ceiling for those who want to remain 
active practitioners and bumps ambitious 
designers up to positions at least 
once-removed from the drawing board. 



A new examining or classifications guide 
should be developed and publicized 
which is similar to the special guide now 
used for research positions in scientific 
disciplines. The guide for research 
positions allows promotion to higher 
levels for scientists without their taking 
the supervisory route to senior level jobs. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from the acceptance of 

this report 



Issues 

1. Need for parity of job 
titles between Government 
and design professions at large 



Recommendations 

1. Modify classifications. 



Action 

CSC 



Target Date* 
6 months 



2. Need to heighten confidence 
in illustrator register 

3. and 4. Need for more 
accurate descriptions of 
designers' special skills 

5. Need for design applicants 
to be rated on the basis of 
samples of their work 

6. Need for nonsupervisory 
routes to higher grades 



2. Solicit cooperation of 
agency art directors. 

3. and 4. Develop supplemental 
application forms. 



5. Establish "Blue Ribbon" panel 
to review portfolios. 



6. Develop new examining or 
classifications guide. 



CSC 



CSC 



CSC 



CSC 



4 months 



4 months 



6 months 



6 months 



Suggested target dates following acceptance of Task Force report 



professional development 



Design which is both contemporary and 
timeless is a difficult achievement, 
requiring continuous professional 
self-renewal. The need for stimulation 
and for the free exchange of ideas and 
information is at least as vital to creative 
people as the need for exposure to new 
techniques is recognized to be for 
professionals in the computer field, 
where there is a great emphasis on 
training. Continuing education is not 
only desirable but essential if Federal 
designers are to maintain a high level of 
interest and productivity. 



recommendations 

1. 

Comprehensive training programs should 
be developed for and promoted among 
Government designers. Their goals should 
be to keep designers abreast of their 
profession, to stimulate them to higher 
levels of creativity and to enrich their 
experience by involving them with 
foremost practitioners in their fields. 
Training should take the form of special 
courses at design schools, seminars at the 
Civil Service Commission or other 
convenient local sites and programs 
at local universities, design schools 
and museums. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



2. 

Departments and agencies should be 
encouraged and assisted to conduct 
ongoing in-house training programs for 
designers and to develop plans for 
continuing self-evaluation. Outstanding 
designers and teachers should be brought 
to Government agencies to lead 
workshops and seminars. Arrangements 
should be made for Federal designers to 
visit studios, museums and companies 
and to participate in other kinds of 
professional tours. Cross-pollination 
of design ideas within agency art 
staffs and between agency art staffs 
should be encouraged and the concept 
of "designer in residence" should be 
explored. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



A practical course for Federal designers 
should be prepared by the 
Government Printing Office to clarify 
ways in which GPO can contribute 
toward producing high quality graphics. 
The course should focus on design 
excellence rather than prohibitions 
under existing rules. The course should 
also improve communications between 
GPO and Federal agencies, dispelling 
myths about the "impossibilities" of 
Government printing. 

Action : 

Government Printing Office 



4. 

Specialized courses for Federal designers 
should be arranged with colleges, 
universities and art schools. Summer or 
other school vacation periods might be 
ideal. Instruction should be practical 
and realistically geared to the Federal 
situation. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Eight months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



A program should be developed for 
detailing Federal designers to private 
firms and studios. The detail would 
broaden the designer's experience and 
give firsthand knowledge of commercial 
practices. In time, the possibility may 
exist for an even exchange of designers 
between Government and industry. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Four months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



Suggested Target Date: 

Four months from acceptance of 

this report and continuing 



Federal designers whose on-the-job 
achievements are outstanding or who 
have nnade valuable contributions to 
professional activities at large should 
by suitably recognized, rewarded and 
publicized. A fornna I committee of 
Government and non-Government 
design professionals should be constituted 
to develop a formalized framework and 
procedures for the recognition of 
outstanding Federal designers. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Suggested Target Date: 

Three months from acceptance of 

this report 



A design register should be compiled 
and frequently updated which would 
list key Federal design professionals and 
describe their responsibilities, 
backgrounds and specializations. It 
should also include information on 
agency programs, design facilities and 
capabilities. Such a register would be a 
valuable aid to Government-wide 
professional communication in 
addition to promoting more efficient 
use of existing Federal design facilities. 
(The Audio Visual Directory now 
published by the National Audio Visual 
Center is an excellent example of this 
type of register.) 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 



Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report 



Issues 

1. Need for central training 
programs for Federal designers 



Recommendations 

1. Plan and sponsor variety 
of courses, seminars, and 
activities. 



Action 

CSC 



Target Date 
6 months 



2. Need for agency training 
programs for Federal designers 



2. Encourage and monitor 
agency training programs. 



CSC 



6 months 



3. Need for course on 
Government printing 



3. Coordinate course at the 
Government Printing Office. 



GPO 



4 months 



4. Need for special courses 
at design schools 



4. Arrange training courses at 
college and universities. 



CSC 



8 months 



5. Need to keep abreast of 
commercial practices 

6. Need to recognize 
achievements of Federal 
designers 

7. Need for better use of 
Federal design resources. 



5. Detail Federal designers to 
firms and studios. 

6. Establish committee to set up 
procedures. 

7. Compile Federal Design 
register. 



CSC 



CSC 

Nat'l Endowment 



CSC 



4 months 



3 months 



6 months 



' Suggested target dates following acceptance of Task Force report 



10 



administrative awareness 



The success of the President's Design 
Improvement Program depends on the 
commitment and sustained support of 
Federal administrators. If administrators 
are given opportunities to develop their 
awareness of the ways in which effective 
design can serve them and enhance 
their agency programs, the commitment 
and support will be forthcoming. 

The First Federal Design Assembly 
opened a line of communication with 
Federal administrators and represented 
the Government's initial design awareness 
program. But the annual Assembly is not 
a panacea for administrative indifference 
to the value of design. A series of 
actions is needed to make administrators 
more design-conscious and to help them 
become better clients for design. 
Programs should be organized to answer 
questions and focus on problems of the 
several different groups who make 
design decisions at all levels in Federal 
agencies. 

recommendations 

1. 

Basic design awareness courses and 
activities should be planned for top 
Federal administrators, including 
department and agency heads and their 
deputies. These courses could become 
part of the curriculum at the Federal 
Executive Institute, Charlottesville, 



Virginia, and at the Executive Seminar 
Centers in Berkeley, California; King's 
Point, New York; and Oak Ridge, 
Tennessee. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Seven months from acceptance of 

this report 



Similar courses and activities should be 
planned for agency off icials whose 
day-to-day decisions affect the design 
quality of Federal agencies. Prime 
candidates for these courses are office 
administrators, budget specialists, 
contracting and procurement officers 
and maintenance officials. These courses 
could be integrated into overall Civil 
Service Commission training activities. 

The following concepts should be 
included among program curricula: 

• The status of design as a profession, 
not a service. 

• Advantages of good design, as it 
affects employee morale and reduced 
turnover rates. 

• Cost savings of integrated design 
decisions. 

• Personnel procedures which can be 
used to encourage excellence. 



• Desirability of encouraging agency 
design professionals to plan their own 
work environments as demonstration 
models of what can be accomplished 
by excellent design . . . values in 
terms of productivity and recruiting 
potential of doing so. 

• Placing design decisions with those 
who are qualified to make them. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 

Five months from acceptance of 

this report 



A pilot workshop seminar on the 
components of the design process— need, 
cost, personnel, problem-solving, 
etc.— should be planned for Federal 
managers. Outstanding Government and 
non-Government design professionals 
should be invited to work with managers 
from a small group of 6 to 8 Federal 
agencies to review and assess their own 
experience and to examine a series of 
case studies. 

Action: 

Civil Service Commission and 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Suggested Target Date: 

Six months from acceptance of 

this report 



Issues 

1 . Need for design awareness 
by agency and department heads 



Recommendations 

1. Conduct training programs. 



Action 
CSC 



Target Date 

7 months 



2. Need for design awareness 

by key executive decision-makers 

3. Need for Federal Managers 
to review mechanics of design 
programs 



2. Conduct training programs. 



3. Conduct pilot workshop/ 
seminar of case studies. 



CSC 



CSC 

Nat'l Endowment 



5 months 



6 months 



Suggested target date following acceptance of Task Force report 



11 



follow through 



Although initiatives for better design 
must find expression and support at the 
policy-making levels of Government, 
success can be assured or frustrated at the 
operating level. If the recommendations 
of this Task Force have no effect in 
agency art departments and personnel 
offices, the effort to improve Federal 
design will fail. 



recommendations 



1. 



A program office should be set up within 
the Civil Service Commission to prepare 
step-by-step guidelines for agencies and 
to monitor progress with implementation 
of adopted Task Force recommendations. 

The program could be channeled directly 
to agencies through an Interagency 
Design Group with mandatory agency 
membership. Such a group should also 
include representatives from the 
American Society of Federal Designers, 
the Federal Design Council and other 
professional societies by invitation. 

Responsibility for coordination of agency 
action should rest with a single design 
administrator, supported by 
management, who will function as agency 
coordinator and representative to the 
Interagency Design Group. 



At present, many agency personnel officers and 
art directors seem unaware of, or unwilling to 
use, flexibilities currently allowed in Federal 
personnel regulations which are available to 
encourage excellence among Government 
designers. Early communications to agencies 
should include the following: 

An extra grade for creativity is currently 
allowed in the qualifications standard. 

Quality step increases in salary are allowed to 
reward employees for high quality work. 

Promotions are provided for on the basis of 
"the impact of the man on the job." The 
exceptional employee can be recognized in 
this way. 

An unsatisfactory employee can be released 
during his probational year. 

"Grade stacking" can be used. AGS-15 
Landscape Architect, for example, can report 
to a GS-15 manager, thus eliminating the need 
for the Landscape Architect to go into 
supervisory work himself. 



Action: 

Civil Service Commission 

Suggested Target Date: 
As soon as possible. 



Issues 

1. Need to monitor 
implementation at agency level 



Recommendations 

1. Establish program office. 



Action 
CSC 



Target Date* 

As soon as 
possible 



'Suggested Target dates following acceptance of Task Force report 



12 



attachments 



13 





HIRING PROCEDURE 

REQUEST FOR APPLICANTS (SKILL FORMS) 






HIRING AGENCY 


® 


CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 






FIVE TOP APPLICANTS 
APPLICANTS NOTIFIED FOR INTERVIEW 






HIRING AGENCY 


® 


APPLICANTS 






PORTFOLIOS, PERSONAL INTERVIEWS 

NOTIFICATION OF SELECTION; 
UNSUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS RETURNED 






HIRING AGENCY 


® 


CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 






■HMIH^ AP 

/T\ A hiring agency will s 
V_y by a completed applica 
required of the prospe 
The Civil Service Comn 
register, and the five 
returned to the hiring 

^2) The hiring agency will 

^^ listing a portfolio as 

All five applicants wi 

/T\ Following interviews, 
^^ — ' notified of the one su 
applicants. The four 
the register, and the 


PLICANT HIF 

ubmit a requ« 
tions skills 
ctive employe 
ission will p 

top applicat 

agency. 

notify all a 

a requiremer 

11 be intervi 

Civil Service 
ccessful and 
unsuccessful 
successful ap 


tEO ^JHI^^H 

)st for an artist, accompanied 
form listing the exact duties 
te. 

urogram the skills into the 
.ions will be 

ipplicants for interview. 

It for interview. 

ewed and portfolios reviewed. 

! Commission will be 
four unsuccessful 
applicants will be returned to 
>pl leant will be hired. 





14 



ESTABLISHMENT OF REGISTER 



RECRUITING BROCHURES, APPLICATIONS 




© 



GOVERNMENT AGENCIES 
PRIVATE INDUSTRY, ART 
SCHOOLS.COLLEGES.UNIV'S. 



APPLICATIONS SKILLS FORMS, PORTFOLIOS 




CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 



© 



BLUE RIBBON RATING PANEL 



© 



APPLICATION IS: 

CODED, AUTOMATED, FILED 

ASSIGNED TO REGISTERS 

REJECTED 

(Applicant notified, portfolio 

returned in all cases) 




ELIGIBLE, "INELIGIBLE" 



© 



© 



© 



The Civil Service Coamiisslon initiates and distributes 
recruiting brochures and applications skills forns to 
government agencies, private industry, art schools, colleges, 
and universities. 

Interested applicants, in turn, submit applications skills forms 
and portfolios to the Civil Service Commission. 

The Civil Service Commission forwards applications skills forns 
to a "Blue Ribbon" Rating Panel for review and grading. 
The Applications Skills Forms and portfolios are returned 
along with "eligible" and "ineligible" ratings to the Civil 
Service Commission. 

Rejected applications and portfolios are returned to unsuccessful 
applicants; Eligible applications are coded, automated and 
computer programmed, and assigned to register(s). In all cases, 
successful and unsuccessful applicants are notified and 
portfolios returned. 



15 





1 


APPLICANTS SKILLS 


Graphic Design 




Check the appropriate BOX in the 

categories below which best describes your 

strength of skill and/or experience, 

using the following scale: 4 Very Strong 3 Strong 2 Adequate 1 Weak None 




4 


3 


2 


1 





SKILLS 


4 


3 


2 


1 





SKILLS 












abstract design 

acrylics 

advertising 

aeronautical 

airbrush 

anatomy 

animation 

architecture 

ART DIRECTOR 

books 

briefings 

calligraphy 

cartoons 

chart preparation 

collage 

color separation 

composition 

comprehensive layout 

computer graphics 

copy fitting 

customer contact 

drafting 

displays 

dummy preparation 

editing 

engraving 

equipment operation 

exhibits 

figure drawing 

fine art 

handcomposition 

hand lettering 

historical 

Illustration 












periodicals 

photo cropping 

photography 

photo retouching 

photo typography 

plotting 

portraits 

posters 

presentations 

proofreading 

publications design 

record albums 

scale models 

scratchboard 

sculpture 

set design 

silk screen 

slides 

storyboards 

technical illustration 

television 

tempera 

three-dimensional 

trademarks, logotypes 

type casting 

typography 

watercolor 
































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































industrial 
























interiors 






















landscape 

layout 

letterheads 

lettering 

letterpress 






































































































map preparation 
























marine 






















mechanical drawing 






















medical 

newspaper 

offset 

oil painting 

package design 

paper sculpture 

paper stocks 

pasteup 

pen and ink 

pencil 
















































































1 





























































































































16 





2 


EMPLOYER'S NEEDS 


Graphic Design 


The activities below have 

been rateci with regard to our needs, 

using the following scale: i Absolutely Necessary 2 Necessary 3 Helpful 4 Not Necessary 




4 


3 


1 


1 


NEEDS 


4 


3 


2 


1 


NEEDS 












abstract design 

acrylics 

advertising 

aeronautical 

airbrush 

anatomy 

animation 

architecture 

ART DIRECTOR 

books 

briefings 

calligraphy 

cartoons 

chart preparation 

collage 

color separation 

composition 

comprehensive layout 

computer graphics 

copy fitting 

customer contact 

drafting 

displays 

dummy preparation 

editing 

engraving 

equipment operation 

exhibits 

figure drawing 

fine art 

handcomposition 

hand lettering 

historical 

illustration 

industrial 

interiors 

landscape 

layout 

letterheads 

lettering 

letterpress 










periodicals 

photo cropping 

photography 

photo retouching 

photo typography 

plotting 

portraits 

posters 

presentations 

proofreading 

publications design 

record albums 

scale models 

scratchboard 

sculpture 

set design 

silk screen 

slides 

storyboards 

technical Illustration 

television 

tempera 

three-dimensional 

trademarks, logotypes 

type casting 

typography 

watercolor 










































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































map preparation 




















marine 


















mechanical drawing 


















medical 


















newspaper 

offset 

oil painting 

package design 

paper sculpture 

paper stocks 

pasteup 

pen and ink 

pencil 






















































1 — 

































































































17 



THE WHITE HOUSE 
WASHINGTON 

May 16, 1972 

One year ago I asked the heads of 63 Federal agencies to determine ways by 
which their agencies could more vigorously assist the arts and, in turn, how 
the arts might be used to enhance their programs. The response to that 
request has been gratifying, calling fresh attention to the importance of the 
arts in the daily operations of Government and leading to the development of 
several recommendations by the National Endowment for the Arts. 

Today, based upon this first set of recommendations by the Endowment, i 
am pleased to announce that we shall move forward on three fronts: 

First, I am asking the Federal Council on the Arts and Humanities to 
sponsor an annual Design Assembly for Federal administrators and artists. 

Second, 1 am asking the National Endowment for the Arts to appoint a 
special ad hoc task force committee to review and expand the publication, 
Guiding Principles for Federal Architecture; this document was first printed 
in 1962 and set forth broad aesthetic recommendations of considerable value. 
I am also asking the National Endowment to recommend a program for 
including art works in new Federal buildings. 

Third, I am taking a series of actions to improve Federal graphics and 
publications. The National Endowment will now be responsible for 
coordinating the efforts of the executive agencies to upgrade their graphics. 
I am also requesting Federal agency heads to make a comprehensive review 
of their own graphics and production, and I am asking the Civil Service 
Commission to review existing procedures for employing artists, architects 
and designers for Federal service. The Commission is also to evaluate the 
need for expert rating panels to review credentials and portfolios of applicants 
for such jobs, as is done in other professional areas. 

The people of this country arc increasingly concerned— and properly so— 
with the physical appearance of their communities. There should be no 
doubt that the Federal Government has an appropriate and critical role to 
play in encouraging better design, and I am hopeful that the actions 
announced today will enable the Government to reflect new standards of 
excellence in all of its design endeavors. 




18 



THE WHITE HOUSE 
WASHINGTON 

July 21, 1972 



Dear Bob: 

Nancy Hanks, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, has just 
told me about your enthusiastic response to the actions I am taking to 
encourage design excellence in Federal architecture, graphics and publications. 
I appreciate this-and 1 invite your participation in our new efforts. 

The Civil Service Commission, with its responsibilities for developing 
qualification standards, examinations and rating procedures for Federal 
employment, is directly involved with the selection of artists and architects 
responsible for the design of Federal buildings and publications. Our 
objective is, in fact, to attract the best available creative talent to Federal 
service. 

So I would like to request the Civil Service Commission to review its 
procedures for recruiting, examining and rating architects, artists and 
designers for employment in the Federal Government. 

It would now be especially helpful for the Commission to evaluate the need 
for establishing separate examinations for architects, artists and designers. 

In addition, I would like to have your own recommendations on the use of 
expert rating panels, consisting of Federal representatives and professionals 
outside the Government, to review the credentials and the portfolios of 
applicants in arts-related professions. 

To undertake this review, you might wish to appoint a task force committee 
composed of representatives from the Civil Service Commission, the National 
Endowment for the Arts and other appropriate Federal agencies, as well as 
professionals from arts-related fields. 

1 think your cooperation in encouraging the Executive Agencies to employ 
creative and talented personnel in arts professions will be invaluable in our 
design improvement effort. And I assure you that you may express my 
own strong personal interest in promoting design excellence through the 
employment of qualified design professionals to all Federal agencies. 

Sincerely, 



Honorable Robert E. Hampton 

Chairman 

United States Civil Service Commission 

1900 E Street NW. 

Washington, D. C. 20415 





19 



notes 



61*0 526-389